Mezquita-Catedral

Bell Tower

From the original Muslim minaret to the current Bell Tower, this structure has played an important role in the image and profile of Cordoba. While throughout its history it has  maintained the same essential function, summoning the faithful, its forms and styles have changed over time. Standing at 54 metres, it is the tallest building in the city. 

After the Christian conquest, the former minaret of the Aljama was converted into a bell tower. It was in use until the year 1589 when an earthquake affected its structure and the decision was made to build a new tower which enveloped part of the Caliphate remains.

The new Cathedral tower was built following the plans of Hernán Ruiz III, who completed the body of bells. After this there were the interventions by Juan Sequero de Matilla, the architect who added the clock body, and Gaspar de la Peña, creator of the cupola on which the figure of Saint Raphael, a work by Pedro de la Paz and Bernabé Gómez del Río, would sit. 

The ringing of bells continues to govern the liturgical life of the Cathedral today. The highlight among these bells is the group of what are called "liturgical bells". Their uniqueness lies in the fact that each of them has a certain name, such as the "Assumption" or "Saint Zoilus", which are shown in an inscription. In some cases other details also appear engraved, such as their year of manufacture, the name of the working canon and the shield of the Bishop who ordered their production. 

Location
Mezquita-Catedral
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